Australia Chair

The Australia Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies is dedicated to increasing understanding between the United States and Australia

The Australia Chair, endowed through the generosity of Pratt Industries, sharpens the focus on U.S.-Australia alliance relations and contributes innovative policy ideas to the rapidly expanding regional and global challenges that call for greater coordination and action by Canberra and Washington. The Chair works to broaden the reach and impact of the U.S.-Australia alliance and Australian ideas, influence, and capacity.

Dr. Charles Edel, a thought leader on U.S. national security and U.S. strategy in the Indo-Pacific and a well-recognized public policy voice in U.S.-Australia relations, serves as the inaugural Australia Chair. The Australia Chair is supported by an advisory council of former senior officials and business leaders led by James Carouso, former chargé d'affaires of the U.S. Embassy in Canberra with senior diplomatic experience across the region.

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Featured Analysis


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Photo Credit: Oleksii/Adobe Stock

Photo Credit: Oleksii/Adobe Stock

Growing Challenges, Rising Ambitions: AUSMIN 2022 and Expanding U.S.-Australia Cooperation

This report examines different pathways for U.S.-Australia cooperation to evolve and deepen. The 18 essays outline the state of play on a range of topics, frame the most salient challenges, and offer more than 70 concrete recommendations for advancing the alliance.

Report by Charles Edel and Lam Tran — December 1, 2022

Recent Analysis


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Photo: SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

Photo: SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

ITAR Should End for Australia

The United States faces its greatest geopolitical challenge since World War II in a global strategic competition with China. To win this competition requires the United States to revise its Cold War-era weapons and sensitive technology control regimes.

Commentary by James Carouso , Thomas Schieffer , Jeffrey Bleich , John Berry , and Arthur Culvahouse — December 7, 2022

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